Anointing of the Sick

 

                                                                       

The anointing of the sick is administered to bring spiritual and even physical strength during an illness, especially near the time of death but please do not wait until your loved one is dying to call for a priest.  Because of their busy schedules, a priest may not be available at the exact time you call.  So if you are aware that the person would benefit from being anointed, please call the rectory right away at (954)431-3600 and give us the necessary information to schedule a visit. The person does not have to be dying to receive this sacrament. A sacrament is an outward sign established by Jesus Christ to confer inward grace. In more basic terms, it is a rite that is performed to convey God’s loving grace to the recipient, through the power of the Holy Spirit. Of course, our healing, like all things, is subject to God’s will. As James pointed out just a chapter earlier, "You do not know about tomorrow. What is your life? For you are a mist that appears for a little time and then vanishes. Instead you ought to say, ‘If the Lord wills, we shall live and we shall do this or that’" (Jas. 4:14–15, emphasis added). We have a promise of healing, but not an unqualified one. It is conditional on the will of God. 

 

The Sacrament’s Institution 

Like all the sacraments, holy anointing was instituted by Jesus Christ during his earthly ministry. The Catechism explains, "This sacred anointing of the sick was instituted by Christ our Lord as a true and proper sacrament of the New Testament. It is alluded to indeed by Mark, but is recommended to the faithful and promulgated by James the apostle and brother of the Lord" (CCC 1511; Mark 6:13; Jas. 5:14-15). 

The anointing of the sick conveys several graces and imparts gifts of strengthening in the Holy Spirit against anxiety, discouragement, and temptation, and conveys peace and fortitude (CCC 1520).

 
The Sacrament’s Effects

 "The special grace of the sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick has as its effects: the uniting of the sick person to the passion of Christ, for his own good and that of the whole Church; the strengthening, peace, and courage to endure in a Christian manner the sufferings of illness or old age; the forgiveness of sins, if the sick person was not able to obtain it through the sacrament of penance; the restoration of health, if it is conducive to the salvation of his soul; the preparation for passing over to eternal life" (CCC 1532). 

Does a person have to be dying to receive this sacrament? No. The Catechism says, "The anointing of the sick is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death. Hence, as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time for him to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived" (CCC 1514). 

 

MPRIMATUR: In accord with 1983 CIC 827 permission to publish this work is hereby granted.  +Robert H. Brom, Bishop of San Diego, August 10, 2004